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Hofstra Univ. Museum Exhibits Feature Traditional and Contemporary Asian Art

Past Traditions/New Voices in Asian Art – Emily Lowe Gallery, Sept. 2-Dec. 10

Exploring the Centuries: 3rd-20th Century Asian Art – David Filderman Gallery, Sept. 16-Feb. 8, 2015

This fall the Hofstra University Museum presents two distinctive exhibitions of Asian art at the Emily Lowe and David Filderman Galleries. Both are offered in association with Asia Transforming: Old Values and New Presences, a conference to be held at Hofstra in September. Past Traditions/New Voices in Asian Art, a distinctive multimedia exhibition created exclusively for the Hofstra University Museum’s Emily Lowe Gallery, focuses on contemporary Asian artists who mix or juxtapose traditional Asian subject matter and techniques with cutting-edge themes and artistic practices. Featured are works on canvas, ceramics, prints, sculpture, work on paper, and a video installation. The works featured in Exploring the Centuries: 3rd-20th Century Asian Art highlight esteemed and centuries-old artistic practices and traditions from the cultures of Japan, China, India, Tibet and Thailand with works from the Museum’s permanent collections.

Chicken_Dance Nyoman Masriadi  Chicken Dance, 2010 On loan from Private Collection Image courtesy of the artist and Paul Kasmin Gallery, NY
Chicken_Dance
Nyoman Masriadi
Chicken Dance, 2010
On loan from Private Collection
Image courtesy of the artist and Paul Kasmin Gallery, NY

Past Traditions/New Voices in Asian Art

Curated by Karen T. Albert, the Museum’s associate director of exhibitions and collections, Past Traditions/New Voices offers audiences a chance to explore dynamic works from nations such as China, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea and Vietnam.  The focus is on contemporary Asian artists who mix or juxtapose traditional Asian subject matter and techniques with modern Western influences, including Xu Bing, Fx Harsono, Yun-Fei Ji, Bari Kumar, Dinh Q. Lê, Nyoman Masriadi, Shazia Sikander and Ai Weiwei.

Beth E. Levinthal, Executive Director of the Hofstra University Museum said, “The Museum’s mission is to advance knowledge and understanding of the world’s diverse cultures through experiences with authentic works of art. This exhibition provides an outstanding opportunity for audiences to learn about the latest artistic directions and developments by esteemed artists from nations throughout Asia. We are most appreciative of the support received from the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York State Council on the Arts, and Astoria Bank that makes this exhibition possible.”

Exploring the Centuries: 3rd-20th Century Asian Art

Co-curated by Ms. Albert and Kristy Caratzola, Exploring the Centuries is divided into three categories: Buddhism; Devotional Sculpture; and Flowers, Animals and the Seasons. Works include woodblock prints, hand-painted scrolls, metal works and sculpture that highlight esteemed and centuries-old artistic practices and traditions from the cultures of Japan, China, India, Tibet and Thailand.

Equestrian Figure Playing a Musical Instrument, 7th century C.E. Early Tang dynasty Ceramic, pigment Hofstra University Museum Collections Gift of Simone Schloss
Equestrian Figure Playing a Musical Instrument, 7th century C.E.
Early Tang dynasty
Ceramic, pigment
Hofstra University Museum Collections
Gift of Simone Schloss

Ms. Levinthal said, “The Museum’s extensive permanent collections provide impressive examples of Asian art representing numerous cultures and artistic approaches. We are pleased to share some of these treasures with our audiences as they make personal connections between Asian art of the past and our contemporary world.  We again thank the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York State Council on the Arts, and also the New York Community Bank Foundation for support.”

Past Traditions/New Voices and Exploring the Centuries are presented in conjunction with Asia Transforming: Old Values and New Presences, an international conference that will be held at Hofstra from September 18-20, 2014, presented by the Hofstra Cultural Center, The New York Conference on Asian Studies and The Mid-Atlantic Region Association for Asian Studies. Conference events will include a reception celebrating both Museum shows on Friday, September 19, 2014, at 4:30 p.m. at Emily Lowe Gallery.

Each exhibition is accompanied by a “Making Connections Guide” as well as interactive touch-screen kiosks that provide supplemental material illustrating conceptual connections and visual similarities between Asian art of the past and present. There are also two fully illustrated catalogs. The catalog for Past Traditions/New Voices features an essay, Inward/Outward: Cultural Transpositions in Contemporary Asian Art, by Michelle Yun, curator of contemporary art at the Asia Society Museum, New York.

Related public programming:

Art Capers: When families visit the Past Traditions/New Voices in Asian Art and/or Exploring the Centuries they can pick up activity materials to solve an Art Caper mystery by unraveling clues in the galleries. Materials are available at Emily Lowe Gallery. There is no fee.

Friday, September 19: There will be professional development workshop for educators, Teaching Asia: Providing Strategies and Resources to Meet the Common Coreoffered from 9-11:30 a.m. for elementary educators and 12:30-3 p.m. for high school educators. This workshop, offered in association with the conference Asia Transforming: Old Values and New Presences, uses both exhibitions to illustrate how authentic objects can guide essential links to classroom curriculum and Common Core standards. The fee for this workshop is $25 and professional development credit may be available. Registration is required by September 5.

Second Saturdays at the HUM – these events are 1:30-2:30 p.m. Fee is $5/per child.

  • October 11: Children can practice the traditional art form of origami at the David Filderman Gallery.
  • November 8: Children will explore works in the exhibition and engage children in a weaving activity, inspired by the work of Dinh Q. Lê at Emily Lowe Gallery.
  • December 13: After viewing the prints on view at the David Filderman Gallery, children will be encouraged and inspired to try making solar prints of their own.

Friday, November 21, 2-3 p.m.: “The Devotional Ceramics of Ancient China” is a lecture by co-curator Kristy Caratzola at the David Filderman Gallery. This event is part of the series Bethpage Federal Credit Union Global Explorations for Adults. Fee is $5 for general audiences and $3 for seniors.

For more information about the exhibits and associated public programs please call (516) 463-5672 or visit the Hofstra University website at www.hofstra.edu/museum.

The Hofstra University Museum has been awarded the highest honor a museum can receive, continued accreditation by the American Alliance of Museums (AAM). Approximately 4% of museums nationwide have earned this distinguished recognition. Accreditation certifies that the Hofstra University Museum operates according to professional standards, manages its collections responsibly and provides quality service to the public.

Top image:

Sun K. Kwak (South Korean, born 1966); Twins, 2004; Masking tape on wood panel; 31 x 31 x 1 in. each (2 panels); Courtesy of Causey Contemporary, Brooklyn, NY; Image © Sun K. Kwak

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