Apophenia for web 2013-12-19 at 1 21 27 PM

Rosenberg Gallery Presents “Apophenia” by Sierra True Siemer

Jan 30 • Fine Arts, Rosenberg Gallery • 470 Views • Comments Off

February 11-April 2, 2014

The term “apophenia” is defined as the experience of seeing meaningful patterns and connections in random or meaningless data. Sierra True Siemer describes her forthcoming exhibition of the same name as an ongoing exploration into the repurpose and reinterpretation of errors, glitches and mistakes. Apophenia opens at Hofstra University’s Rosenberg Gallery on February 11, 2014, and runs through April 2.  It is presented by Hofstra’s Department of Fine Arts, Design, Art History. An opening reception will be held at 11:15 a.m. on Tuesday, February 11.

Gallery viewing hours are 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Monday through Friday. Admission is free. The Rosenberg Gallery is located on Hofstra’s South Campus in Calkins Hall. For more information call (516) 463-5474.

Screen Shot 2 2013-12-19 at 1.21The show explores unstable, or “broken” aesthetics, created through data bending, glitching, slit scanning, misusing, disrupting, and distorting images, video, and code. The resulting pieces become a collaboration with chance and code, computer and designer.

The term has come to represent the human tendency to seek patterns in random information in general, though is particularly associated with paranormal phenomena such as aliens, ghosts, the Bible code, EVP, and numerology. In statistics, apophenia is called a Type I Error. Experiences that seem random or meaningless, like a chance encounter, an error, or an image’s raw code, actually can be quite meaningful.

Born in 1987 in New York, Sierra Siemer creates work at the intersection of art and design and low vs. high technologies. Initially trained in print and book making, she became interested in new forms of media and expression through her involvement in the electronic music scene and passion for science fiction and the future.

She completed her Master’s in Communications Design at Pratt Institute in 2013, where she explored the use of randomness in a design methodology and as a strategy towards divergent thinking and creative innovation. Her work embraces unexpected outcomes and the repurpose and reinterpretation of errors, glitches, and mistakes. She lives and works in New York City.

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