Washington Seminar Students

Five Students Chosen for Prestigious Washington Center Seminar

Dec 11 • Academics, Peter S. Kalikow Center for the Study of American Presidency, Political Science, Student Honors, Top Stories • 2204 Views • Comments Off

Five Hofstra students with outstanding academic records and an interest in political science have been chosen to participate in a prestigious seminar on bi-partisan cooperation between the White House and Congress at The Washington Center.

The students, all political science majors, were chosen to attend the all-expenses-paid seminar, “Inside Washington: Exploring Bipartisan Solutions; Politics and the Media”, based on their academic record, involvement in leadership at Hofstra and interest in government. The students’ expenses are being paid for through scholarships from The Washington Center, Hofstra and Scott Rechler, chief executive officer of RexCorp Realty, LLC, who provided scholarships to send five Hofstra students to a similar seminar in 2013.

The five students chosen are:

  • Julie Rafatpanah, ’15, who is majoring in political science, history and global studies. “I think that experiencing policy-making firsthand will give me a greater understanding of our political system, as well as how my generation can hope to improve it in the future. I also aim to learn more about cultivating compromise and bipartisanship in an effort to promote more involvement on campus at Hofstra.”
  • Nicole Olson, ’16, who is majoring in political science and global studies. “I believe that I will learn skills that will make me a better leader within the Student Government Association. I also hope to improve my skills of working in a group atmosphere and interacting with other students who have all different perspectives.”
  • Blaine Volpe, ’16, who is majoring in political science and economics. “A major reason I decided to major in political science was to explore how government works, but lately it seems government does not want to work. Is that because of a lack of bipartisanship? Also, just because there is currently a political divide, does that mean our government is broken?”
  • Michael Greco, ’16, who is majoring in political science. “I hope to learn more about pressing issues facing Americans in the 21st century and, more specifically, how to formulate a policy that could address key issues.”
  • Marissa Espinoza, ’15, who is majoring in political science, economics and psychology. “Policy-making in the United States has many quirks and flaws, and is highly influenced by the individual agencies involved in the policy-making process. I aspire to work in the policy-making process, more so from the outside, evaluating the various influences that play a role in the legislation and decisions that come from Washington, D.C.”

The Washington Center is a non-profit organization that hosts seminars and other courses about American politics and governance for more than 30 years. The 2014 seminar will include academic study of bi-partisanship in theory and practice and focus on three issues: financing the American Dream in the 21st century, energy and the environment, and immigration. After lectures from scholars and political practitioners, the students will work in small groups to develop their own reform proposals.

The second week of the seminar will examine how the media report on and communicate national politics and policies to different audiences, and how new media have changed American politics. Dr. Meena Bose, director of Hofstra’s Peter S. Kalikow Center for the Study of thency American Presidency  will be the faculty director for the seminar.

 

 

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